Today: 20.Oct.2019
Several energy types
Several energy types (82)

Discusses most or all energy sources used today.

15.Jul.2018 Written by

Paul Driessen, Senior Policy Analyst for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow, CFACT, JD, B.A. Geology and Field Ecology, David Wojick, Heartland Institute, Ph.D. Philosophy of Science and Mathematical Logic, B.Sc. Civil Engineering: We castigated Multilateral anti-Development Banks for using exaggerated and fabricated manmade climate cataclysm claims to justify rejecting funding for coal and natural gas electricity generation, promoting unreliable renewable sources – and thereby keeping impoverished nations poor, disease ridden, largely jobless and dying far earlier than they should.

12.Oct.2015 Written by

Conrad Ladd - He describes life in rural America before electricity arrived and the process of bringing electricity to farms. He became a Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and an early pioneer in planning and designing commercial fast reactors. Mechanical Engineers played an important role in the development of commercial nuclear power and advanced fast reactor nuclear power, which is the best option for electric power for the world for the long term future.

16.Jul.2015 Written by

John Droz is the publisher of "Energy and Environmental Newsletter." This is a sample newsletter showing types of topics covered. We encourage everyone to go to the link to read the actual articles.

16.Jun.2016 Written by

Robert Bryce, author of “Smaller Faster Lighter Denser Cheaper,” captures the headlong rush of Western culture’s endless drive for ever better technology. It is an extraordinary impulse that has created a world in which more people live longer and more comfortably than ever before. Mr. Bryce’s policy prescriptions will be more welcome in Houston than in the White House. He contends that the pantheon of environmentalists like Mr. Gore, Bill McKibben, Amory Lovins and Greenpeace are wildly optimistic in their extravagant hopes for wind power, solar cells and biofuels.

15.May.2019 Written by

Rob Jeffrey, Independent Economic Risk Consultant: South Africa is now (2018) in a recession, the fact is that South Africa does not have the financial resources to revitalise itself. The country suffers from a low savings rate and the government has no money to undertake the task of renewal and development itself. The only means to forge ahead is to make the country attractive to both domestic and foreign investment. Yet there are wild calls for expropriation without compensation, nationalisation of various industries, including one of the most damaging of the lot nationalising the SA reserve bank or using it as a pot of gold. These calls if they are implemented or gather in strength will drive South Africa into an economic death spiral similar to Zimbabwe and Venezuela.

One of South Africa’s key electricity technology energy advisors is a German renewable energy expert and supplier of German wind turbine equipment. Unbelievable. That highlights the desperate situation South African energy is in. German national energy programs based on wind and solar are only one natural crisis away from being in a disastrous situation.

24.Oct.2015 Written by

Leon Louw - South Africa’s need for a reliable, clean form of base load power couldn’t be clearer. The prolonged period of ‘load shedding’, brought on by a severe overreliance on coal, is having a catastrophic effect on South Africa’s promising economy with only 1.5% GDP growth in 2014; the lowest since the financial crisis in 2009 (World Bank).

15.May.2019 Written by

Rob Jeffrey, Independent Economic Risk Consultant: The three major objectives of the country are poverty alleviation, reducing inequality and raising standards of living. These objectives can only be achieved by maintaining a high rate of economic growth, thereby reducing levels of unemployment and raising the standard of living. Electricity is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for economic growth. The necessary condition for sustainable economic growth is that there is a stable and secure supply of electricity at the lowest effective economic cost when delivered to the user. The sufficient condition requires that economic, social and political conditions must be put in place to foster and encourage domestic and foreign investment, thereby creating demand for productive and economically efficient industries.

23.Jan.2018 Written by

John Shanahan, civil engineer, President of Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA: This is a simple, short comparison of wind, solar, fossil fuels and nuclear power. Two have extremely low energy density, require lots of materials, maintenance and tremendous volume of new parts every 20 to 30 years. They are also variable to non-existent sometimes and cause havoc with electrical energy grids for modern society. The other two are high to very high energy density and require much less land. The 2009 - 2017 White House, its Science Advisor, John Holdren, and Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton are strong proponents of wind and solar energy, want significant reductions in use of fossil fuels and did little to promote nuclear power for the future. Most of the rest of the elected officials in the White House and Congress from the mid 1970s through 2018 have done little to develop a national energy plan. There are programs for assisting Americans with health care and retirement, but no national energy plan, except to use what is the cheapest or what is popular with voters today.

17.Aug.2018 Written by

Survey by John Shanahan, civil engineer, Environmentalists for Nuclear - USA, EFN-USA, website: efn-usa.org and John Droz, physicist, Alliance for Wise Energy Decisions, website: wiseenergy.org: This survey has ten questions about fossil fuels, man-made global warming, and nuclear energy. Understanding the roles of fossil fuels and nuclear and the debate about man-made global warming are essential to making a better world. It was sent only to the Board of Advisors for EFN-USA. There were 13 responses from members in Chile, France, India, New Zealand and the United States. While the number of responses is very small, they come from people, most of whom have lots of experience in these fields. The survey presents their answers and most importantly their comments - all anonymously. Finally, one respondent offered an additional comment, beyond the scope of the survey. We considered it very valuable and posted it on the last page of this report.

14.May.2018 Written by

David MacKay, Professor of Physics, University of Cambridge: How can we power a modern lifestyle without fossil fuels? Individual actions saving 10% here and 40% there will not get us off fossil fuels. To eliminate fossil fuel use, we will surely also need to increase the amount of energy we get from non-fossil-fuel sources. Even if we imagine strong efficiency measures and smart technology switches, halving our energy consumption from 125 kWh per day per person to 60 kWh per day, we should not kid ourselves about the scale of the energy challenge which would remain. If Britain and the United States were to "get off" fossil fuels, what would the effect be on Earth's climate? Most of the rest of the world can not afford to "get off" fossil fuels or do not have the right governments, economies, education systems, industrial capacity to do so.

  • Latest
  • Popular
  • Howard Cork Hayden, Emeritus Physics Professor, University…
  • Howard Cork Hayden, Emeritus Physics Professor, University…
  • Viv Forbes, Executive Director of the Saltbush…
  • Times of India: Greta Thunberg, the 16-year…
  • Los Angeles Times: California has always prided…